Grace Jones

 

“I’VE ALWAYS BEEN A REBEL. I NEVER DO THINGS THE WAY THEY’RE SUPPOSED TO BE DONE. EITHER I GO IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION OR I CREATE A NEW DIRECTION FOR MYSELF, REGARDLESS OF WHAT THE RULES ARE OR WHAT SOCIETY SAYS.”

“MEN ARE TERRIFIED OF ME. I CAN EASILY STEP INTO STEP INTO THE MAN’S SHOE, AND THAT PUTS THE MAN IN A POSITION WHERE HE HAS TO BECOME THE FEMALE. THAT’S WHAT SETS OFF THE TENSION. BUT MY IMAGE IS SUPPOSED TO FRIGHTEN MEN - SO ONLY THE GOOD ONES COME THROUGH.”

“ONCE I WAS OUT OF THE FORMULA OF SCHOOL OR A NINE TO FIVE I CREATED MY OWN HOURS. I AM NOCTURNAL. FOR ME CREATIVITY COMES AT NIGHT. THERE’S SOMETHING NEW ABOUT NIGHT. IT HAS A DIFFERENT ENERGY. NIGHT’S A VOID I CAN CREATE IN”

(quoted from: http://www.theworldofgracejones.com/)

Joseph Cornell

Joseph Cornell (December 24, 1903 – December 29, 1972) was an American artist and sculptor, one of the pioneers and most celebrated exponents of assemblage. Influenced by the Surrealists, he was also an avant-garde experimental filmmaker.  Cornell’s most characteristic art works were boxed assemblages created from found objects. These are simple boxes, usually glass-fronted, in which he arranged surprising collections of photographs or Victorian bric-à-brac, in a way that combines the formal austerity of Constructivism with the lively fantasy of Surrealism. Many of his boxes, such as the famous Medici Slot Machine boxes, are interactive and are meant to be handled.  Like Kurt Schwitters Cornell could create poetry from the commonplace. Unlike Schwitters, however, he was fascinated not by refuse, garbage, and the discarded, but by fragments of once beautiful and precious objects he found on his frequent trips to the bookshops and thrift stores of New York. His boxes relied on the Surrealist technique of irrational juxtaposition, and on the evocation of nostalgia, for their appeal.  Joseph Cornell’s 1936 found film montage, Rose Hobart, was made entirely from splicing together existing film stock that Cornell had found in New Jersey warehouses, mostly derived from a 1931 ‘B’ film entitled East of Borneo. Cornell would play Nestor Amaral’s record, ‘Holiday in Brazil’ during its rare screenings, as well as projecting the film through a deep blue glass or filter, giving the film a dreamlike effect. Focusing mainly on the gestures and expressions made by Rose Hobart (the original film’s starlet), this dreamscape of Cornell’s seems to exist in a kind of suspension until the film’s most arresting sequence toward the end, when footage of a solar eclipse is juxtaposed with a white ball falling into a pool of water in slow motion.

Cornell premiered the film at the Julien Levy Gallery in December of 1936 during the first Surrealist exhibition at the Museum of Modern Artin New York. Salvador Dalí, who was in New York to attend the MoMA opening, was present at its first screening. During the screening, Dali became outraged at Cornell’s movie, claiming he had just had the same idea of applying collage techniques to film. After the screening, Dali remarked to Cornell that he should stick to making boxes and to stop making films. Traumatized by this event, the shy, retiring Cornell never showed his films publicly again.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Cornell

Images from:  http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/cornell/

Damien Hirst loves butterflies

http://www.damienhirst.com/

 

We love butterflies!

Images from Natural History Musem’s collection of butterflies and Moths

We found this tray in a second hand shop in Norway, fab!

 

Siri Tollerød

We love the looks of this Norwegian new model superstar. Images from Lula and Another Magazine

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